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Archive for the ‘Local Images’ Category

If you are coming from downtown Chattanooga, cresting the hill on MLK going toward Highland Park & Missionary Ridge, this is what you’ll see.

I will not even pretend that I get up all raring to go and take photos of gorgeous downtown Chattanooga. I have a child who goes to school at Brown Academy right there in front of UTC, otherwise I would totally have snoozed through this bit of loveliness.

That dark blurry bit at the bottom right corner is Park Place, the old school building turned loft/condo. The various units have square footage from 790 all the way up to 2,750 so there’s a good choice of space, whatever you may need. And for buyers with kids who may have avoided downtown condos in the past due to a lack of outdoor play areas, Bryant Park – a fenced playground – is right next door.

It’s a pretty easy walk to UTC and the nightlife of downtown, especially Nightfall and the Bessie Smith ‘Strut’.

Want to hear about another great perk when it comes to buying at Park Place? As of right now, the Lyndhurst Foundation is offering a $10,000 grant to buyers. Yep, you can negotiate your best price on the condo of your choice and then Lyndhurst will give you a $10,000 credit at closing. In some cases you might even be able to use this cash as part of your down payment (your mileage may vary – check with your lender on this).

Click here to see what’s currently for sale at Park Place. None of these are my listings, FYI…

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Even though it’s cold outside, baby, it’s warm inside the carousel at Coolidge Park in North Chattanooga. One dollar per person per ride and it even accepts credit cards.

Interested in the history of the grand old lady? Click here.

Check out this link to see current operating hours for the carousel.

Think you might want to live within walking distance of the park? Click here for currently available homes within just a half mile.

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Julia Odom enjoys long walks on the beach, debating the restoration vs. renovation question and hanging out with plumbing inspectors

Visit her website to search for homes.

Do you have a Chattanooga area image you’d like to share (credit given),

community event to promote or maybe even a crime to report?

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The Chattanooga National Cemetery is a beautiful and awe inspiring place. Founded during the Civil War to bury the Union dead who were killed at the Battle for Chattanooga, it is the largest national cemetery in Tennessee.

Located on the edge of the Highland Park neighborhood at the corner of Bailey & Holtzclaw Avenues, this is a wonderful place to come to reflect on our nation’s history, particularly in the quiet of sunrise, when this photo was taken.

Click here for more information about the cemetery and its history.Chattanooga National Cemetery

Looking at homes for sale in Highland Park, Chattanooga, northwest Georgia or the surrounding areas? Drop me a line for more information.

Contact me for more information about anything you see on this blog.

Visit my website to search for homes.

Subscribe to my blog to stay updated on Chattanooga homes for sale,

real estate news and community interest.

Do you have a Chattanooga area image you’d like to share (credit given)

or a community event to promote?

Email me the details: Julia@JuliaOdom.com

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Before there were historic homes in Chattanooga, there was, well, history. Nowhere is that more evident than along Missionary Ridge.

Information in the next paragraph is taken from the big ol’ plaque next to this guy.

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On the morning of November 25, 1863, General US Grant’s Union Army began its attack on Confederate General Braxton Bragg and his troops which occupied Missionary Ridge and the slopes below. The Union victory here was decisive, leaving strategic Chattanooga firmly in the hands of the Northern Army and set the stage for the march to Atlanta by General Sherman.

Many monuments to the fallen & victorious remain along the Crest Road, which is divided into North Crest and South Crest.Missionary Ridge home with view

The historic nature of the homes, many of which were built in the early to mid 20th century, along with stunning views of either downtown Chattanooga or the Brainerd area and beyond – sometimes both! – makes this a prime area for estate homes.

Think you might want to live on ‘the Ridge’? Looking for a place with a cannon in the front yard (aren’t we all??)?  Click here to see homes currently for sale.

View from Missionary Ridge

Contact me for more information about anything you see on this blog.

Visit my website to search for homes.

Subscribe to my blog to stay updated on Chattanooga homes for sale, real estate news and community interest.

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This sign makes me smile every time I drive by it. Which is quite a lot since it’s close to my boy’s school.

I mean, who doesn’t love chopped weiners with their pit bar-b-q?

Chattanooga Images Memo's

Contact me for more information about anything you see on this blog.

Visit my website to search for homes.

Subscribe to my blog to stay updated on Chattanooga homes for sale,

real estate news and community interest.

Do you have a Chattanooga area image you’d like to share (credit given)

or a community event to promote?

Email me the details: Julia@JuliaOdom.com

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Fort Wood Historic Neighborhood ChattanoogaInformation shamelessly taken from the Fort Wood National Historic District website, the photos are mine:

Fort Wood’s distinctive homes reflect Chattanooga’s unique heritage and the community’s evolution over time.  The district is located just east of Chattanooga’s original 1838 boundaries; it was annexed by the city in 1851.  The original “fort” was an earthwork stronghold constructed by Union forces in 1863 during their occupation of Chattanooga.

During the late-nineteenth century scattered residential development occurred in Fort Wood.  A number of residences from the 1800s still grace Fort Wood streets today.  These older homes in Fort Wood reflect the charm and diversity of Victorian and Neoclassical architecture, fashionable styles in turn-of-the-century Chattanooga.Fort Wood Neighborhood Chattanooga Real Estate

Between 1900 and 1910, Fort Wood became one of the most exclusive residential sections in Chattanooga.  The installation of one of Chattanooga’s first electric streetcar lines on Oak Street in 1889 encouraged prominent citizens to take up residence in the newly developed area.  Many of Chattanooga’s leading citizens built their homes in Fort Wood, including T. C. Thompson, Mayor of Chattanooga from 1909-1915; George Fort Multon, publisher and part owner of the Chattanooga News; and Samuel Read, owner of the Read House, an important Chattanooga hotel.  Through architecture, these influential politicians, businessmen, real estate developers, doctors and lawyers left their mark on Fort Wood during its heyday from the turn-of-the-century through the 1940s.

Historic Fort Wood Home

Fort Wood exhibits a variety of architectural styles, including an impressive collection of Queen Anne-style homes.  The house at 800 Vine Street is an outstanding example of Queen Ann architectural design.  Described as “Byzantine Revival” when it was built, the house displays elaborate stone detailing and an asymmetrical arrangement of unique design features.

Today, the Fort Wood neighborhood gives a charming impression of cohesiveness through the combinations of late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century architectural styles.  The tree-shaded streets, wide sidewalks, and uniform setbacks with raised yards and surrounding retaining walls add to the sense of architectural unity.Fort Wood Historic Neighborhood 3

Contact me for more information about anything you see on this blog.

Visit my website to search for homes.

Subscribe to my blog to stay updated on Chattanooga homes for sale, real estate news and community interest.

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From hang gliding to hiking, rock climbing to river running, Chattanooga has everything an outdoor enthusiast or extreme sports lover could want. A perennial favorite of Outside Magazine, Chattanooga has a lot to offer the outdoorsman (or outdoorswoman as the case often is).

White water rafting/kayaking

There are lots of options for Chattanoogans but the A1, end all, be all is the Ocoee River. Home of the 1996 Olympic white water events, the Ocoee has long been a favorite among Hamilton County residents. It also draws day visitors from North Carolina, South Carolina & Georgia. It’s just that good. Camping facilities and gorgeous hiking trails along with the tamer Hiwassee River (inner-tubing can sometimes be as fun as surfing the whitewater) are nearby for the waterlogged.

Hang gliding

Lookout Mountain is the premier place in the South East for gliding effortlessly over a valley floor. Lookout Mountain Hang Gliding is that place. For the less experienced, tandem flights are available. If you’re afraid of heights, DON’T LOOK DOWN. On the other hand, if you want an experience you will never forget, suit up and run off the edge of a mountain.

Rock Climbing

With the varying stone makeup of the surrounding mountains, Chattanooga has become a mecca for climbers with some calling Lookout Mountain’s Sunset Rock the birthplace of sandstone climbing in the South. There is no doubt that Chattanooga boasts some of the best climbing in the region with a number of indoor climbing gyms to get your fix even when the weather doesn’t cooperate.

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